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Integrated, optimized, and robust nonlinear energy harvesting solutions for self-powered system condition monitoring sensors

Ryan Harne, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering serves as PI for the project “Integrated, optimized and robust nonlinear energy harvesting solutions for self-powered system condition monitoring sensors.” This project delivers localized electric power sources for numerous sensors and devices by converting the kinetic energies of the vehicles into sufficient DC power for the local electronics. The technical challenges surrounding this project involve establishing robust methods that effectively capture and convert the vibration energies available despite the time-varying nature of the vehicle and sub-system motions. Harne and his team use theoretical, simulation and experimental methods to illuminate the complex, electromechanical dynamic framework at hand, and consider realistic input vibrations, such as those measured from vehicles in motion, to characterize the optimality of the DC power delivery from such vibration energy harvesters. 

"The demands of light-weighting and material efficiency for vehicle systems encourage the innovative use of all energy resources available," said Harne.